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actuallyintroverted:

September is Arnold Chiari Malformation Awareness Month

Chiari is a serious neurological disorder where the bottom part of the brain, the cerebellum, descends out of the skull and crowds the spinal cord, putting pressure on both the brain and spine, and disrupting the normal flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Symptoms include debilitating headaches, arm/hand weakness, nausea,  cognitive issues (memory loss, problems processing information), and loss of fine motor skills.

From Conquer Chiari

Once thought to be rare, MRI’s have dramatically increased estimates of the number of people with Chiari (~300,000 in the US). This lack of awareness creates an additional burden for patients as they try to explain to family members, friends, employers, etc. what they are going through.

In addition, the lack of general awareness has translated into a lack of research dollars from the US government. Diseases which affect about the same number of people receive millions of dollars of federal support each and every year.

It’s time to raise our voices, raise our profile, and make people aware.

(via dave-youfool)

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newsweek:

It’s been over a decade since American psychologists Leaf Van Boven and Thomas Gilovich concluded that doing things makes people happier than having things. “To Do or to Have? That Is the Question” was the title of the study they published in 2003 (PDF), and it’s been cited hundreds of times since.
Many people now recognize that spending money on, say, a plane ticket for a vacation is more satisfying in the long run than purchasing a new television for the same price. But happiness studies keep evolving, and social scientists continue to find new ways of understanding precisely how our economic choices affect well-being.
A new paper, this one also co-authored by Thomas Gilovich, hones in on another difference between experiential and material purchases: how people feel before they make these purchases, when they’re simply entertaining thoughts of booking flights to the Caribbean or going to the movies, or thinking about shopping for clothing or jewelry.
Gilovich and his colleagues asked subjects to think about either an experiential or material purchase they were planning on making very soon, evaluate whether their anticipation made them feel excited or impatient, and rate the overall pleasantness of the anticipation.
The researchers also conducted a separate study in which they polled 2,226 adults on their iPhones at random times to ask whether the individuals were, in that moment, contemplating any future purchases (and if so, whether the purchase would be experiential or material, and whether they associated the thoughts with markedly pleasant, exciting, or impatient anticipatory feelings).
You Should Spend Money on Experiences, Not Things - CityLab

newsweek:

It’s been over a decade since American psychologists Leaf Van Boven and Thomas Gilovich concluded that doing things makes people happier than having things. “To Do or to Have? That Is the Question” was the title of the study they published in 2003 (PDF), and it’s been cited hundreds of times since.

Many people now recognize that spending money on, say, a plane ticket for a vacation is more satisfying in the long run than purchasing a new television for the same price. But happiness studies keep evolving, and social scientists continue to find new ways of understanding precisely how our economic choices affect well-being.

A new paper, this one also co-authored by Thomas Gilovich, hones in on another difference between experiential and material purchases: how people feel before they make these purchases, when they’re simply entertaining thoughts of booking flights to the Caribbean or going to the movies, or thinking about shopping for clothing or jewelry.

Gilovich and his colleagues asked subjects to think about either an experiential or material purchase they were planning on making very soon, evaluate whether their anticipation made them feel excited or impatient, and rate the overall pleasantness of the anticipation.

The researchers also conducted a separate study in which they polled 2,226 adults on their iPhones at random times to ask whether the individuals were, in that moment, contemplating any future purchases (and if so, whether the purchase would be experiential or material, and whether they associated the thoughts with markedly pleasant, exciting, or impatient anticipatory feelings).

You Should Spend Money on Experiences, Not Things - CityLab

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iheartmyart:

Zdzisław Beksiński
(via bestqualitybeksinski)
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(Source: s-e-t-apart, via alecsgrg)

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artofthedarkages:

Gospels, MS 58, Trinity College Dublin

everything is illuminated.

(via arthistorycq)

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tastefullyoffensive:

How to exit the back of a pickup truck. [via]

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saccstry:

Opalitis, a condition in which opals grow rapidly on a person’s skin until their entire body becomes opalized. 

saccstry:

Opalitis, a condition in which opals grow rapidly on a person’s skin until their entire body becomes opalized. 

(via shenaniganswillensue)

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dave-youfool:

HELLO EVERYBODY I HAVE EJACULATED A FETUS WOULD ANYONE LIKE TO STICK IT ON A BLAZING HOT IRON THEN EAT ITS CHARRED REMAINS
JUST THROWING IT OUT THERE

dave-youfool:

HELLO EVERYBODY I HAVE EJACULATED A FETUS WOULD ANYONE LIKE TO STICK IT ON A BLAZING HOT IRON THEN EAT ITS CHARRED REMAINS

JUST THROWING IT OUT THERE

Text

dave-youfool:

carlospalmer:

instead of calling someone a “grammar nazi”, why not try:

  • word nerd
  • syntax whiplash
  • fuckin geek
  • speech preacher
  • punctuate infatuate-er
  • ~Lord English~
  • grAMMAR SLAMMER

Or how about

FOOOOOOOOOOoooor

He himself has said it

and it’s greatly to his credit

that he is an English geek

thaaaaat he iiiss aaan eh eh eh eh eh eh eh eh ehhhhhhhhhh

nglishgeek

SPEACH PREACHER.  sing it.

(Source: carlospalmer)